Kings, Queens & Sister-Wives: Sex and Mating Habits of Anunnaki Gods | Divine Right & Royal Dynasties

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Absent from the early editions of the Necronomicon Anunnaki Bible, the Tablet-U Series (“Book of the Underworld“) was not available until 2011 in Liber-C, originally distributed as Beyond the Ishtar Gate, appearing also in Necronomicon Spellbook III released first to the Mardukite Chamberlains (Mardukite Research Organization). Liber-C is also published in the Year-3 Mardukite Anthology Necronomicon Grimoire (formerly Necronomicon Workbook); the Tablet-U Series appears in the final edition of the Necronomicon Anunnaki Bible (the core volume of research).

Dynamics of this series — mainly sexual practices and mating customs of the Anunnaki hierarchy — were catalogued, instructed to and adopted by demigods and Dragon Courts of Kings and Queens. These dynamics are concisely explained by the late Zecharia Sitchin in End of Days.

beyondishtarfrontimg “The key to unlocking the mystery of the gods’ succession (and marriage) — realizing that these rules also applied to the people chosen by them [Enlil] to serve as their proxies to Mankind. In the biblical tale of the Patriarch Abraham explaining his sister-wife in Genesis: ‘Indeed, she is my sister, the daughter of my father, but not the daughter of my mother, and she became my wife.’ Not only was marrying a half-sister from a different mother permitted, but a son by her — in this case Isaac — became the Legal Heir and dynastic successor, rather than the Firstborn Ishmael, son of the handmaiden Hagar.

“Though those succession rules appear complex, they were based on ‘Bloodlines‘ — what we now recognize as sophisticated DNA genealogies that also distinguished between general DNA inherited from the parents as well as the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) that is inherited by females only from their mother. Dynastic lines continue through the male line; the Firstborn son is next in succession; a half-sister could be taken as wife if she had a different mother; and if a son by such a half-sister is later born, that son — though not the Firstborn — becomes the Legal Heir and the dynastic successor.

“The rivalry between the two half-brothers Ea/Enki (Firstborn of Anu, but not be his official spouse, Antu) and Enlil in matters of the throne was complicated by personal rivalry in matters of the heart. They both coveted their half-sister Ninmah, whose mother was yet another concubine of Anu. She was Ea/Enki‘s true love, but he was not permitted to marry her. Enlil had a son by her — Ninurta. Though born without wedlock, the succession rules made Ninurta uncontested heir of Enlil, being both a Firstborn son and one born by a royal half-sister…”

Zecharia Sitchin


1001015_318340804969022_2026839541_n The “Descent cycle” of Inanna-Ishtar shows her connection to the “Underworld”, and thereby the “Other”, but it does so for the explicit reasons described in the Tablet-C “Crossings” series, involving her relationship with the Queen of the Underworld, Ereshkigal, her own sister, as well as Ereshkigal‘s surface world Anunnaki consort, Nergal.

NecroBible6ththumb Nergal [ne-uru-gal] is the “lord of the great dwelling” and his wife, Ereshkigal [eres-ki-gal] isa perfect counterpart, being the ‘lady of the great earth’. The cult-center for their tradition worship was the city of Cuth (or Kutha), making the “Man-of-Cuth” literally “Kutu-lu”, CTHULHU, a name which makes frequent appearances in more Necronomical flavored lore related to the Underworld.


LIBER-C, Tablet-U, “The Courtship of Ishtar and Dumuzi”

The brother spoke to his younger sister.
The Sun God, SHAMMASH (UTU), spoke to INANNA-ISHTAR, saying:
“Lady, the flax in its fullness is lovely.
Ishtar, the grain is glistening in the furrow.
I will work the ground for you it for you.
I will bring the grain to you.
But a piece of linen-cloth, big or small, is always needed.
Ishtar, I will bring it to you.”

INANNA-ISHTAR said:
“Brother, after you’ve brought me the flax, Who will comb it for me?”

SHAMMASH (UTU) replied:
“Sister, I will bring it to you combed.”

INANNA-ISHTAR said:
“Utu, after you’ve brought it to me combed, Who will spin it for me?”

And SHAMMASH (UTU) responded:
“Inanna-Ishtar, I will bring it to you spun?”

INANNA-ISHTAR said:
“Brother, after you’ve brought the flax to be spun, Who will braid it for me?”
And SHAMMASH (UTU) responded:
“Sister, I will bring it to you braided.”

INANNA-ISHTAR said:
“Utu, after you’ve brought it to me braided,
Who will weave it for me?”

And SHAMMASH (UTU) replied:
“Sister, I will bring it to you woven.”

INANNA-ISHTAR said:
“Utu, after you’ve brought it to me woven,
Who will bleach it for me?”

And SHAMMASH (UTU) responds:
“Inanna-Ishtar, I will bring it to you bleached.”

Angered now, INANNA-ISHTAR demanded:
“Brother, after you’ve brought my bridal sheet to me,
Who will go to bed with me!?
Who, Utu, who will sleep with me!?”

SHAMMASH (UTU) calmly replied:
“Sister, your bridegroom will go to bed with you.
He who was born from a fertile womb,
He who was conceived on the scared marriage throne,
Dumuzi, the shepherd! He will go to bed with you.”

INANNA-ISHTAR spoke:
“No, brother!
I want the farmer!
He is the man of my heart!
He gathers the grain into great heaps.
He brings the grain regularly into my storehouses.”

SHAMMASH (UTU) said:
“Sister, you should marry the shepherd.
Why are you unwilling?
His cream is good; his milk is good.
Whatever he touches shines brightly.
Inanna-Ishtar, marry Dumuzi.
You who adorn yourself with the agate necklace of fertility alone,
Why are you unwilling?
Dumuzi will share his rich cream with you.
You who are meant to be the kings protector,
Why are you unwilling?”

Still angry, INANNA-ISHTAR the spoke:
“The shepherd?!
I will not marry the shepherd!
His clothes are course; his wool is rough.
I will marry the farmer.
The farmer grows flax for my clothes,
The farmer grows barley for my table.”

Then DUMUZI arrived and said:
“Why do you speak about the farmer?
Why do you speak about him?
If he gives you black flour’
I will give you black wool.
If he gives you white flour,
I will give you white wool.
If he gives you beer,
I will give you sweet milk.
If he gives you bread,
I will give you honey cheese.
I will give the farmer my leftover cream.
I will give the farmer my leftover milk.
Why do you speak about the farmer?
What does he have more than I do?”

Laughing, INANNA-ISHTAR replied:
“Shepherd-boy, without my mother, Ningal, you’d be driven away;
Without my grandmother, Ningikugga, you’d be driven into the Abyss,
Without my father, Nanna, you’d have no roof,
Without my brother Utu-Shammash. . .”

DUMUZI interrupted:
“Inanna, do not start a quarrel with me.
My father, Enki, is as good as your father, Nanna.
My mother, Sirtur, is as good as your mother, Ningal.
My sister, Geshtinanna, is as good as yours, Ereshkigal…
So, Queen of the palace,
let us talk it over, shall we?”

The words they had spoken between them were words of passion and desire.
From the starting of the heated quarrel came the lovers desire for each other.
DUMUZI, The Shepherd, went to the royal house with cream.
He went to the royal house with milk.
Before the door, he called out:
“Open the house, My Lady, open the house!”

INANNA-ISHTAR ran to the arms of NINGAL, her mother.

NINGAL counseled her daughter, saying:
“My child, this young man will be your father.
My daughter, this young man will be your mother.
He will treat you like a father.
He will care for you like a mother. “

Still DUMUZI called:
“Open the house, My Lady, open the house!”

INANNA-ISHTAR, at her mothers command,
Bathed and anointed herself with scented oil.
She covered her body with the royal white robe.
She readied her dowry.
She arranged her precious lapis lazuli beads around her neck.
She took her seal in her hand.

DUMUZI waited expectantly.
INANNA-ISHTAR opened the door for him.
Inside the house she shined before him.
Like the light of the moon.
DUMUZI looked at her joyously.
He pressed his neck close against hers.
He kissed her.

INANNA-ISHTAR then said:
“What I tell you
Let the singer weave into song.
What I tell you,
Let it flow from ear to mouth,
Let it pass from old to young:
My vulva, the horn,
Is The Boat of Heaven,
Is full of eagerness like the new moon.
Who will plow my vulva?
Who will plow my high field?
Who will plow my wet ground?
I am a young beautiful woman;
Who will plow my vulva!?
Who will station the ox there!?
Who will plow my vulva!?”

DUMUZI smiled and said:
“Great Lady, the king will plow your vulva!
I, Dumuzi the King, will plow your vulva.”

INANNA-ISHTAR screamed:
“Then plow my vulva, man of my heart!
Plow my vulva!
Do it now!”

When after the king’s lap stood the rising cedar.
Plants grew high by their side.
Grains grew high by their side.
Gardens flourished luxuriantly.

INANNA-ISHTAR sang in delight:
“He has sprouted;
He is fertile growth planted by the water.
He is the one my womb loves best.
My well-stocked garden in the plains,
My barley growing high in its furrow,
My apple tree which bears fruit up to its crown,
He is fertile growth planted by the water.
My honey-man, my honey-man sweetens me always.
My lord, the honey-man of the gods,
He is the one my womb loves best.
His hand is honey, his foot is honey,
He sweetens me always.
My eager man who caresses my navel,
My man who caresses my soft thighs,
He is the one my womb loves best.
O, how I love him!
He is my fertile growth planted by the water.”

And DUMUZI sang:
“O Great Lady, your breast is your field.
Inanna-Ishtar, your breast is your field.
Your broad field pours out the plants.
Your broad field pours out grain.
Water flows from on high for your servant.
Bread flows from on high for your servant.
Pour it out for me, Inanna-Ishtar.
I will drink all you offer.”

INANNA-ISHTAR said passionately:
“Make your milk sweet and thick for me, my bridegroom.
My shepherd, I will drink your fresh milk.
My wild bull, Dumuzi, make your milk sweet and thick.
I will drink your fresh milk.
Let the milk of the goat flow in my sheepfold.
Fill my holy churn with honey cheese.
Lord Dumuzi, I will drink your fresh milk.
My husband, I will guard my sheepfold for you.
I will watch over your house of life, the storehouse,
The shining quivering place which delights;
The house which decides the fates of the land,
The house which gives the breath of life to the people.
I, the queen of the palace, will watch over your house.”

DUMUZI spoke:
“My sister, I would go with you to my garden.
Inanna, I would go with you to my garden.
I would go with you to my orchard.
I would go with you to my apple tree.
There I would plant the sweet, honey-covered seed.”

INANNA sang:
“He brought me into his garden.
My brother, Dumuzi, brought me into his garden.
I strolled with him among the standing trees,
I stood with him among the fallen trees,
By the apple tree I knelt as is proper.
Before my brother coming in song,
Who rose to me out of poplar leaves,
Who came to me in the midday heat,
before my lord, Dumuzi,
I poured out plants from my womb.
I placed plants before him,
I poured out plants before him.
I placed grain before him,
I poured out grain before him,
I poured out grain before my womb.”

She sang louder:
“Last night as I, the Queen, was shining bright,
Last night as I, the Queen of Heaven, was shining bright,
As I was shining bright and dancing,
Singing praises at the coming of the night;
He met me! He met me!
My lord Dumuzi met me!
He pushed his hand to my hand.
He pressed his neck close against mine.
My high priest is ready for the holy loins.
My lord Dumuzi is ready for the holy loins.
The plants and herbs in his field are ripe.
O Dumuzi! You fullness is my delight!”

She called for it, she called for it, she called for the bed!
She called for the bed that rejoices the heart.
She called for the bed that sweetens the loins.
She called for the bed of kingship.
She called for the bed of queenship.

INANNA-ISHTAR called for the bed:
“Let the bed that rejoices the heart be prepared!
Let the bed that sweetens the lions be prepared!
Let the bed of kingship be prepared!
Let the bed of queenship be prepared!
Let the royal bed be prepared!”

She spread the bridal sheet across the bed.
She called to the king:
“The bed is ready!”
She called to her bridegroom:
“The bed is waiting!”
He put his hand in her hand.
He put his hand to her heart.
Sweet is the sleep of the hand-to-hand.
Sweeter still is the sleep of heart-to-heart.

INANNA-ISHTAR said:
“I bathed for the wild bull,
I bathed for the shepherd Dumuzi,
I perfumed my sides with ointment,
I coated my mouth with sweet-smelling amber,
I painted my eyes with coal.
He shaped my loins with his fair hands.
The Shepherd, Dumuzi filled my lap with cream and milk,
He stroked my pubic hair,
He watered my womb.
He laid his hands on my holy vulva,
He smoothed my black boat with cream,
He quickened my narrow boat with milk,
He creased me on the bed.
Now I will caress my high priest on the bed,
I will caress the faithful shepherd Dumuzi,
I will caress his loins, the shepherdship of the land,
I will decree a sweet fate for him.”

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Filed under akkadian, ancient esoterica, ancient near east, assyrian, babylonian, mardukite, mesopotamian, sumerian

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